Monthly Archives: April 2014

Planting quantity verse harvest quantity

Ever wonder how much produce your plot will produce when you plant seeds or seedlings? Diane Brooks from Delridge Giving Gardens sent us the results from their garden last year.

Here’s some numbers from Delridge P-Patch Giving Garden that might help new gardens understand what they can expect from their plantings.

The list is the plant, start or seed quantity  = pounds harvested. For example, for 16 tomato plants, they harvested 58 pounds of fruit

Plant # of plants or seeds quantity Pounds harvested
tomato 16 plants = 58 pounds
hot pepper 16 plants = 6 1/2 pounds
beets 60 plants = 8 pounds
zukes 3 plants 95 pounds
Patty Pan squash 1 plant 8 pounds
Kabocha squash 1 plant 2 1/2 pounds (1 squash only)
cilantro 150 plants 30 pounds (harvested w/roots)
bunching onion 1 seed pack 11 pounds
Komatsuna Japanese Spinach Mustard 174 plants 41 pounds (club root infestation)
Scarlet Runner beans 1 seed pack 60 pounds
basil 27 plants 10 1/2 pounds (seems high!??) – they grew fast after each cutting
Giant Snow peas 1 pound seeds 42 pounds (partial crop failure after germination)

Thanks Diane for this information. It should help us plan what we plant this year in our own giving gardens!

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SGGN Sprouts – Learn about our greenhouses!

Since about 2008, a Wallingford Greenhouse project has grown thousands (+7000 in 2013!) of vegetable starts in a resident’s greenhouse in Wallingford. In 2012, a Ballard resident offered his greenhouse to grow starts as well.

Each February, community volunteers refresh their seed-sowing skills and begin planting snow and snap peas, followed by lettuces, kales, beans, tomatoes, peppers, and other vegetable varieties that grow well in Seattle. As successions of seeds are sown in the greenhouses, winter blankets of burlap and leaves are removed from Giving Gardens in the city’s P-Patches.

Two major events follow: Seattle’s Giving Garden Network Gathering and Interbay P-Patch’s Giving Garden Kick-off and kale harvest. These are where the first greenhouse vegetable seedlings are distributed. Starts continue to leave the greenhouse through July, and are distributed to waiting Giving Gardens across Seattle. The seedlings help extend the growing season and increase harvests, allowing more produce to be donated to food banks, shelters, and meal programs. Vegetable varieties are tailored to food bank requests and ensure that different cultural communities receive familiar and favorite foods. In 2013, over 29,000 pounds of fresh produce was donated directly by 64 Giving Gardens!

We are always looking for volunteers and welcome volunteers at all levels – from workers in the greenhouses to planners to distribution experts ! To volunteer, please go to the CONTACT US page of this website and let us know of your interest.